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Thursday, October 17
 

8:30am PDT

Opening Plenary Session
Keynote Speakers to include:
Justin Paredes, Tulare County Office of Education
Heidi Carmen, Exeter Union High School
Daniel Ledesma, Richland Junior High School

Thursday October 17, 2019 8:30am - 9:15am PDT
Redwood Rooms DECF

9:30am PDT

Economics
This session will begin with an examination of Financial Literacy (FL) as it is described in the History-Social Science (HSS) Framework with particular attention to human capital and benefit-cost analysis as they relate to FL.  Attendees will discover how a focus on the themes of content, literacy, and inquiry will prepare high school graduates to acquire the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to become responsible, engaged citizens as they examine economic content, topic, and issues from Chapter 18 of the HSS Framework.

Specific areas of content focus will include labor and financial markets and both the U.S. and Global economies all the while addressing choice, use of physical and human resources, and making informed decisions.


Speakers
avatar for Josh Mitton

Josh Mitton

California Council for Economics Education
JC

Jim Charkins

California Council for Economics Education
Jim Charkins - Chief academic officer, California Council on Economic Education, Founding Board member, California Association of School Economics Teachers, 2012 Hilda Tabba Award Winner, 2014 National Council on Economic Education Adam Smith Award winner, member California History/Social... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 9:30am - 10:45am PDT
Redwood H

9:30am PDT

Elementary Inquiry: Before Linda Brown, there was Sylvia Mendez
This session will provide participants with an overview of the History-Social Science Framework in the upper elementary grades, with an emphasis on the shifts of instruction and themes across grade levels.  As inquiry is a central shift in the new History Social-Science Framework, its important that students are given ample opportunities to ask questions, dive into documents, and engage in academic conversations with fellow students. There are numerous ways to structure inquiry and this session will explore a few tried and true methods.  A model lesson utilizing primary sources, children’s literature, and informational text focusing on the Mendez v. Westminster court case will also be shared.

Speakers
avatar for Katharine Cortes

Katharine Cortes

UCDHP
Katharine Cortes is the Associate Director of the UC Davis History Project with a PhD in History from UC Davis. Her mission at the History Project is to build a community of educators centered on creating rich inquiry-based history-social science instruction.
avatar for Kate Bowen

Kate Bowen

Teacher Leader, California History-Social Science Project
I am a recently retired elementary teacher with over 35 years of classroom experience. I love designing lessons for 3rd-6th grade students, especially those that integrate ELA/ELD standards.



Thursday October 17, 2019 9:30am - 10:45am PDT
Sugar Pine A/B

9:30am PDT

Environmental Literacy
What is environmental literacy and why does it matter?
Studying the past through an environmental lens provides students with a more comprehensive understanding of the motivations, possibilities, and constraints of different peoples throughout history and today. In this session, participants will receive a brief introduction to California’s Environmental Principles and Concepts (EP&Cs) and related classroom resources, and have the opportunity to identify how and when to best integrate these new ideas into their instruction. There will be time for teachers to work with grade-band colleagues to develop environmental literacy-based learning objectives for at least one content standard. Teachers will be given selected primary sources by grade band and Education and the Environment Initiative (EEI) materials that can support their new learning activities. As a group, we will discuss and brainstorm teachers’ ideas and strategies for integrating environmental literacy in their classrooms.


Speakers
SB

Shelley Brooks

California History-Social Science Project



Thursday October 17, 2019 9:30am - 10:45am PDT
Redwood B

9:30am PDT

Ethnic Studies
This session will explore not only the new grade nine elective course but also how themes in ethnic studies are addressed throughout the framework through its new focus on broadening the diversity of the course narratives. Through workshop activities attendees will dig into how these themes are taught through the United States and world history sequence.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Muniz

Jason Muniz

Program Coordinator, UC Berkeley History Project
I am the most recent addition to the UCB-HSSP team!I come to the position of Program Coordinator after having taught High School Social Studies in The Oakland Unified School District for seven years. The last three of those years were spent developing and teaching Ethnic Studies... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 9:30am - 10:45am PDT
Redwood A

9:30am PDT

Framework-Aligned Assessment: Measuring CLIC
This session will support teachers to understand how to measure student learning of each element of the Framework through content, literacy, inquiry, and citizenship (CLIC). It will offer teachers practical examples that they can then use to develop their own assessments. The session will begin with examples of different types of assessments, such as constructed response, that allow us to measure specific aspects of CLIC. It will provide examples as well as frames and templates to support teachers to develop their own assessments. Teachers will then break into grade level groups and we will offer grade-level sources for teachers to use as stimuli to develop assessments. Teachers will provide feedback to one another and have time for reflection and revision. The assessments developed in the session will be added to a Google drive that teachers will be able to access. These can also be made available to the communities of practice across the state. The session's intention is that for the presentations in the fall, we will share sources of topics taught in the fall. For example, Africa in 7th grade, then in the spring, similarly, we will work on topics covered in that time period, such as the Americas. That way, the assessments that are created and shared build upon one another and continue to serve as a resource for teachers. Our goal is for this presentation to be an opportunity to network teachers across the state with practical exemplars of assessments aligned to the Framework they can use, like a CLIC test bank.

Speakers
DM

Daisy Martin

Director, The History and Civics Project at UC Santa Cruz



Thursday October 17, 2019 9:30am - 10:45am PDT
Redwood C/D/E/F

9:30am PDT

World History, Grades 6-7
This session will offer inquiry sets for 1 or 2 investigative questions for Grades 6 and 7.  After a brief discussion of framing and strategies for inquiry, teachers will receive background on the historical context and have the opportunity to work with the sources and discuss implementation with each other.  This will be repeated for 2 or 3 additional source sets.

Speakers
avatar for Shennan Hutton

Shennan Hutton

Program Coordinator, California History-Social Science Project
Shennan Hutton has taught world history in high school for 15 years, before entering the graduate program at UC Davis. She earned a Ph.D. in medieval European history in 2006. She teaches medieval, European and world history at various colleges and universities, as well as promoting... Read More →



Thursday October 17, 2019 9:30am - 10:45am PDT
Redwood G

11:00am PDT

FAIR Act K-8
LGBTQ-related content appears in the Framework in grades 2, 4, 5, and 8. What’s the best way to teach it in accurate, engaging, accessible, and age-appropriate ways? In this session, educators will workshop different possibilities for elementary and middle school classrooms. We will focus on two key areas that might feel especially challenging conceptually and pedagogically—Native American gender diversity and so-called “passing” men and women in the 18th and 19thcenturies. The Framework signals multiple entry points into teaching the embraced third- and fourth-gender roles within Native American cultures—“two-spirit” traditions—and the impact of the loss of those roles due to European conquest and settler colonialism. How can these histories be incorporated into 4th-grade California mission history, 5th-grade Early American history, and 8th-grade histories of western expansionism? How did some people assigned female at birth passed and lived as men during the Revolutionary era and the Frontier West? What did this mean then, and what can it tell us about those times and places? How do these histories live on with us in the present? Professor Romesburg will share primary and secondary sources from which educators will collaborate on strategies to bring this content into their classes. This session aligns with Framework Chapter 7 (pp. 68, 76, 78, 79), Chapter 8 (p. 98), and Chapter 12 (pp. 249, 264, 274).

Speakers
avatar for Don Romesburg

Don Romesburg

Sonoma State University
Don Romesburg is Professor of Women's and Gender Studies at Sonoma State University. He is editor of the Routledge History of Queer America (2018) and was the lead scholar working to bring LGBT content into California's 2016 K-12 History-Social Science Framework and textbooks. He... Read More →



Thursday October 17, 2019 11:00am - 12:15pm PDT
Redwood G

11:00am PDT

Highlighting Native Californian History through the Framework
The Framework calls for more complex examinations of Native Californian history across grade levels and time periods. This session will focus on ways to incorporate the history and culture of Native Californian peoples into lessons at both primary and secondary levels. Lessons that explore Native Californian history provide teachers with unique opportunities to connect students with local history and living Native communities that, historically, have been frequently misrepresented and not consulted in public representations of their groups. Furthermore, this topic allows teachers and students to explore interdisciplinary themes that span the various fields of social and behavioral sciences, including history, geography, economics, civics (political science), anthropology, religious studies, and psychology. Investigations that focus on the lifeways of Native Californians both before and after foreign contact highlights important historical thinking strategies including understanding diverse perspectives, evaluating historical evidence, recognizing continuity and change, assessing cause and consequence, and unpacking ethical considerations of the past.  
This session will engage participants in a model lesson that investigates the experiences of Native peoples during transitional times in California’s history—guided by the major instructional shifts in the Framework. Participants will use inquiry to investigate primary source content from the following periods: pre-contact, European settlement, the Gold Rush, and the early 1900s.  Participants will also leave with exposure to Teaching California Inquiry Sets for grades 3, 4, and 10 (that can be also adapted for grade 8) that address Native Californian history and culture.


Speakers
SB

Shelley Brooks

California History-Social Science Project
avatar for Michelle Lorimer

Michelle Lorimer

CSU San Bernardino
Michelle Lorimer is a historian and lecturer at CSU, San Bernardino. Her work focuses on History-Social Science education methods and her content focus is the representation of Native people in California history. She is an author and contributor for Teaching California instructional... Read More →



Thursday October 17, 2019 11:00am - 12:15pm PDT
Redwood B

11:00am PDT

Instructional Materials
This session will provide resources and strategies for administrators to plan their history-social science instructional materials adoption process. First the session will introduce the HSSFW Chapter 23, Criteria for Evaluating Instructional Materials: Kindergarten Through Grade Eight; and the process the materials went through to be adopted by the State Board of Education. Additionally, the session will highlight and discuss Category 1, Criteria 14 and Education Codes, which requires instructional materials to address the FAIR Act, giving administrators a chance to discuss concerns and will provide recommended resources to assist their efforts to address these concerns. The remainder of the session will feature example processes and resources, including model timelines and templates districts have used to complete their adoption. These will include, but not be limited to informing teachers on the new Framework and four shifts, working with teachers to narrow materials to pilot, how to incorporate parent and community input, and how to manage a pilot and the selection. District leaders who have worked through these processes will share their experiences. Participants will have plenty of time to engage in discussion to learn from each other and have questions answered by the presenters. Find materials here: http://bit.ly/HSSIntructionalMaterials

Speakers
avatar for Stacey Greer

Stacey Greer

Director, History Project at UC Davis



Thursday October 17, 2019 11:00am - 12:15pm PDT
Redwood H

11:00am PDT

Making History: Inviting Students and their Histories into the Knowledge Construction Process
UCBHSSP has developed an approach to history instruction that invites students into the learning process through the use of their own, and their community’s, history as week as the knowledge construction process. Participants will be introduced to the vision of a Making History teacher, who views themselves as a learner within the context of their school community and its resources, as well as one of the historical thinking modules. In demonstrating the historical thinking module, participants will first apply the concept to their own life histories. They will then explore how that concept can be reinforced through content application and refined in a culminating project. A UCBHSSP teacher leader will co-facilitate so as to discuss how they have incorporated the approach into their own instruction.

Speakers
PG

Phyllis Goldsmith

College/University, CHSSP
Phyllis Goldsmith, as Director of Teacher Development for the UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project, develops workshops and curriculum to assist K-12 teachers and districts to plan for instruction and implement strategies to promote academic equity while addressing the history... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 11:00am - 12:15pm PDT
Redwood A

11:00am PDT

U.S. History Topics
This session will provide a thematic approach to address the content and inquiry-based form of instruction in U.S. history courses.  The session content material applies primarily to grades 8, 11, and 12.  The thematic approach introduced in the first phrase of the Framework conference that highlighted the enduring themes of citizenship, movement, and historical perspectives will serve as a foundation for this deeper exploration of the themes.  The session will focus more heavily on introducing the themes in the first and last units in the U.S. history grade level courses.  Examples that focus on recent history will also guide discussions of the thematic approach.  Participants will receive 2-4 inquiry sets that address this content.

Speakers
avatar for Beth Slutsky

Beth Slutsky

California History-Social Science Project
Beth Slutsky earned her Ph.D. in U.S. history from the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), where she focused her study on the U.S. during the Cold War and Women’s history. Slutsky has teaching experience at both the secondary and post-secondary levels, and has worked extensively... Read More →



Thursday October 17, 2019 11:00am - 12:15pm PDT
Redwood C/D/E/F

1:00pm PDT

Backward Mapping
The California History-Social Science Framework suggests a plan to help teachers organize their courses around questions and topics of disciplinary significance (ch.21).
The Framework asks to teachers to consider, “What topics of relative significance, enduring understandings-or 'big ideas'-can be learned.” This session will demonstrate
how history-social science teachers can translate these big, significant ideas into yearlong Essential Questions using cascading questions, informed by the backwards mapping model developed by Wiggins and McTighe in their seminal work Understanding by Design. In this presentation participants will learn how to effectively
and intentionally organize their content in order to create inquiry-driven courses.
 
LInk to Resources to Assist in Planning After the Session: http://ucbhssp.berkeley.edu/framework-references


Speakers
avatar for Rachel Reinhard

Rachel Reinhard

Site Director, CHSSP
Rachel Reinhard directs the UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project.



Thursday October 17, 2019 1:00pm - 2:15pm PDT
Redwood H

1:00pm PDT

FAIR Act, Grade 11
While there is substantial LGBTQ content at multiple grade levels and throughout the Framework, 11th grade is the place where the bulk of the content appears, for obvious reasons. Teaching about the 20th century U.S. means understanding the development of both LGBTQ communities and the emergence and elaboration of an LGBTQ rights and liberation movement. In this session, educators will engage with several key entry points into this content and its related concepts: The Harlem Renaissance (1910s-1930s) and the Lavender Scare and Related LGBTQ Rights Movements (1940s-1960s). Using both primary and secondary sources, educators will workshop various possible ways to integrate this content into their existing curricula with methods based in inquiry, interpretation, and critical thinking. This session takes an intersectional approach to this history and our classrooms--it is attentive to the ways that race, class, gender, and sexuality must be understood as interrelated social dynamics of power, meaning making, and identity. This session aligns with Framework Chapter 16 (pp. 392, 411, 415, 421).

Speakers
avatar for Don Romesburg

Don Romesburg

Sonoma State University
Don Romesburg is Professor of Women's and Gender Studies at Sonoma State University. He is editor of the Routledge History of Queer America (2018) and was the lead scholar working to bring LGBT content into California's 2016 K-12 History-Social Science Framework and textbooks. He... Read More →



Thursday October 17, 2019 1:00pm - 2:15pm PDT
Redwood G

1:00pm PDT

From Legislation to the Classroom: Teaching the Election of Barack Obama
Amongst the required new teaching topics in the Framework is the election of Barack Obama to the Presidency. This topic allows not only for specific investigation into the significance of this election and how it fits (and doesn’t fit) into stories of Civil Rights and the second decade of the 21st Century, it can also serve as a case study into additional important issues. These include issues of content such as, how do we teach the recent past? and how do we teach the Presidents? This topic also allows us to explore issues of process, such as, how do we use the Framework and content standards as a teaching guide while tailoring specific curriculum and instruction for our particular teaching context? This session will engage participants in a lesson that uses legislation and excerpts from the Framework and standards to both introduce this topic and promote discussion of how we implement the Framework. We will then consider specific content questions (see above) through participant investigation and reading of relevant primary and secondary sources. Participants will leave with materials for teaching Obama’s election and presidency, a deeper understanding of choices to be made when teaching the recent past and the Presidents, and a set of questions for translating teaching topics related to the Presidents for their local contexts. This session will aim to make both the implementing of the Framework and standards into particular lessons, and considerations when teaching the Presidents, relevant and appropriate for both elementary and secondary educators.

Speakers
DM

Daisy Martin

Director, The History and Civics Project at UC Santa Cruz



Thursday October 17, 2019 1:00pm - 2:15pm PDT
Redwood C/D/E/F

1:00pm PDT

Global Education
In this session, teachers will be introduced to the Global Competence Framework developed by CGEP and enhanced with benchmarks developed by the California Global Education Network (CDE, CWLP). Based on global competence domains, indicators, benchmarks, and the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals, teachers will bring a “global perspective” to their K-12 course of study for History-Social Science. They will be guided by the seven themes outlined in Appendix B of the H-SS Framework as teachers consider problems, questions, and themes in the History and Geography classroom. They will also use information presented in Appendix D (Teaching the Contemporary World) to explore globalization as a key theme for teaching history and geography across the grades. Attention will also be paid to Appendices E (Civic Education) & G (Environmental Education). Yes, this is a lot! But there is a rich quality that can be brought to every standards-based H-SS program when the teacher understands, integrates, and teaches global competence. Teachers will be provided examples, models, and strategies for using a global perspective to engage students in the development of H-SS knowledge, global competence skills, and agency required of citizens at local and global scales.  

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Emily Schell

Dr. Emily Schell

Executive Director, California Global Education Project
Dr. Emily Schell is Executive Director of the California Global Education Project, one of nine discipline-specific K-12 professional learning networks of the California Subject Matter Project. Schell is a former GATE teacher, Social Studies Resource Teacher, and site principal in... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 1:00pm - 2:15pm PDT
Redwood B

1:00pm PDT

Integrated Action Civics
Come explore Integrated Action Civics in which content informs civic engagement and conversely integrates civic empowerment strategies into your course content. We'll look at a model for integrating civic engagement into your course and share several frameworks for examining power that help students understand history content while preparing them for possible civics action projects in your course. By integrating civic engagement with course content, this model helps students learn and apply historical content knowledge and critically important discipline-specific literacy and analytical skills to their understanding of, and response to, contemporary social and political issues. Participants will engage with these strategies and leave with classroom-ready materials.

This approach to civics integration is being developed by the UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project (UCBHSSP) in partnership with the Santa Clara County Office of Education (SCCOE) along with a teacher research group.

Speakers
avatar for Devin Hess

Devin Hess

Academic Coordinator, UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project
Devin Hess is an Academic Coordinator and Director of Technology Integration for the UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project, leading professional development for educators in the SF Bay Area since 2012. Currently, he leads UCBHSSP’s “Integrated Action Civics” research programs... Read More →



Thursday October 17, 2019 1:00pm - 2:15pm PDT
Redwood A

2:30pm PDT

CAASP Performance Task Integration with H-SS Inquiry
While the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) is a statewide exam in English-Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics, the literacy skills assessed in the ELA Performance Task frequently use History-Social Science content.  In this session, participants will review the literacy skills required for students to be successful for the CAASPP and connect these skills with History-Social Science content. We will look at sample Performance Tasks developed for use in a History-Social Science classroom and then practice scoring sample student work from these Performance Tasks using CAASPP rubrics adapted for History-Social Science.

Speakers
avatar for Justin Paredes

Justin Paredes

Staff Development & Curriculum Specialist - History & Integrated Studies, Tulare County Office of Education



Thursday October 17, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm PDT
Redwood A

2:30pm PDT

Geography
This session will focus on tools and strategies to help students (and teachers!) develop geography content knowledge and academic literacy while also supporting inquiry and informed action.  Tools presented will include a discussion guide that supports critical reading and reinforces key disciplinary concepts, frameworks for developing both compelling and supporting questions using a geographic lens, online mapping exercises that trigger spatial thinking, geo-histograms to bring spatial and historical perspectives together, and citizen science programs that encourage exploration and observation of local and remote environments.



Thursday October 17, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm PDT
Redwood H

2:30pm PDT

Lesson Planning with Primary Sources
Using the Library of Congress’s digital archives as a foundation, this workshop focuses on lesson planning that includes inquiry, primary sources, and literacy. Participants will be supported with instructional materials and given time to create or adapt a lesson plan. During this hands-on workshop for lesson development, we will provide tips for creating inquiry questions, templates for backwards planning, primary source sets created by the CHSSP and the Library of Congress, as well as literacy strategies for how students will access and interact with instructional materials.

Speakers
avatar for Tuyen Tran

Tuyen Tran

California History-Social Science Project
Tuyen Tran is a Assistant Director of the California History-Social Science Project (CHSSP). She holds a Ph.D. in History from UC Berkeley. Dr. Tran coordinates and manages statewide programs for the CHSSP network.



Thursday October 17, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm PDT
Redwood C/D/E/F

2:30pm PDT

Utilizing the History-Social Science Framework to Prepare all Students for Citizenship
This session will begin with an examination of the “citizenship” theme as it is described in the History-Social Science Framework with particular attention to the need and urgency of citizenship education as part of a well-rounded history-social science program.  Attendees will discover how a focus on the themes of content, literacy, and inquiry prepares young people to acquire the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to become responsible, engaged citizens by examining civic inquiries in specific chapters of the Framework in their grade level descriptions.

We will explore the various components of civic learning as described in the Framework and engage participants in an activity to practice reading specific content and utilize strategies to deepen content understanding and strengthen deliberation skills. A number of engaging resources and opportunities including the Judges in the Classroom program and California Civic Learning Award program from the Power of Democracy, based on research-based best practices for civic learning, led by California Chief Justice Tani G. Cantil-Sakauye will be showcased as will the California State Seal of Civic Engagement and the Civics Digital Chalkboard from the California Department of Education.


Speakers
avatar for Frank Pisi

Frank Pisi

Director, History-Social Science, Sacramento COE
Frank began his teaching career at the middle school and high school levels in the Elk Grove Unified School District, serving as classroom teacher and curriculum coordinator. At the California Department of Education, Frank helped shape school reform policy and worked to ensure greater... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Herczog

Michelle Herczog

Coordinator III, History-Social Science, Los Angeles COE
Michelle Herczog is responsible for providing professional development, resources, and support for K-12 social studies educators throughout the 80 school districts of Los Angeles County.  She is a Past President of the National Council for the Social Studies and served as Vice-Chair... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm PDT
Redwood B

2:30pm PDT

World History, Grade 10
This session will offer inquiry sets for 3 or 4 investigative questions for Grade 10.  After a brief discussion of framing and strategies for inquiry, teachers will receive background on the historical context and have the opportunity to work with the sources and discuss implementation with each other.  This will be repeated for 2 or 3 additional source sets.

Speakers
avatar for Shennan Hutton

Shennan Hutton

Program Coordinator, California History-Social Science Project
Shennan Hutton has taught world history in high school for 15 years, before entering the graduate program at UC Davis. She earned a Ph.D. in medieval European history in 2006. She teaches medieval, European and world history at various colleges and universities, as well as promoting... Read More →



Thursday October 17, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm PDT
Redwood G